JeffBM

Question about paint

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Greetings, I have a question about my paint and while it isnt necessarily related to Dr.G's products im not sure who else I could ask and get an answer, so if it isnt out of bounds could someone ask Dr.G his opinion on this.

 

My truck didnt come with an insulation mat under the hood and after last winter is was repainted. My question is , does the insulation material prevent premature paint failure, esp. to aftermarket paint?

 

From what Ive found out is dodge, (ram) stopped using the mat because of some sort of blow by of oil in their diesels and it was collecting the oil in the material. I think Dodge felt it could be a fire hazard.

 

Thats my best understanding on it.

 

Thanks in advance

 

Jeff

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There's no one-fits-all answer to that question. It's true that the underhood blanket helps preserve the paint by lessening the exposure to heat, but most do a poor job. I removed the dirty, ugly blanket from my El Camino and replaced it with Reflectix, a foil-faced bubble wrap insulation from Lowes. I still have the OEM 30 year-old lacquer paint and it's doing well so far.

 

Bill

 

IMG_1565.jpg

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How would it suppress a fire

According to our GM Product trainers, blankets were held in place purely with a few plastic retainers. The theory was that, in the event of an engine fire, the retainers would melt, allowing the blanket to drape over the engine and suppress the flames.

Questionable, IMO.

 

Bill

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According to our GM Product trainers, blankets were held in place purely with a few plastic retainers. The theory was that, in the event of an engine fire, the retainers would melt, allowing the blanket to drape over the engine and suppress the flames.

Questionable, IMO.

 

Well, that makes sense, actually. How effective it would be, I don't know.

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I've had both, but i have to believe it's by design to have it and not a matter of opinion. An engineer would likely say its needed while a technician thinks "well i've never had an issue". I would insist that all plastic and insulation be restored to factory condition by any bodyshop and then check to see even if they say they did. There are too many places that cut corners for cost reasons these days.

 

I think it goes without saying that it's there for a reason otherwise it wouldn't be there. When I had my first or second car there was that cardboard gasket between the bottom of the air cleaner and the carb. Mine split, so I went to an auto parts store and asked for it, and the guy behind the counter said "oh, you don't need that" to which I immediately thought, if the mfr. didn't think it was necessary, they never would have put it on in the first place, notoriously penny-pinching that they are.

 

I wound up having to buy a whole carb rebuild kit to get the gasket. My understanding has always been that the hood insulator was there to prevent blistering the paint on the hood, I'm sure today with engine compartments being better sealed, noise is also a factor, although engine covers seem to be the preferred way to do that. I have to believe the fire suppression function mentioned above was only thought of once they started using plastic retainers...I'm sure the blankets had metal fasteners in the 60's.

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