patrickl80

Best Paint Correction Product

Recommended Posts

I have heard on videos or in podcasts that Mercedes clearcoat is challenging to correct, but it also depended on the year model.  What is the best Optimum combination to get a descent correction on a 2017 in black that was taken through the car wash a few times before I bought it?

On a similar side, I have heard that GM onyx black is challenging as well, so same question here.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't speak to black Mercedes specifically, but if it's light marring/swirling you need to remove, Optimum Hyper Polish with an orange foam pad should be effective.  If more cut is required, try Optimum Intensive Polish with the same pad. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most German makes are considered "hard" paint (exception being Porsche and select Audi models) so will typically require more aggression to achieve required paint correction.  So Ron's suggestion of Optimum Orange (medium cut) foam pad for polishing is probably most appropriate to start.  For "medium" to "soft" paint, you would typically use Optimum Black (light cut) foam pad for polishing and in some extremely "soft" paint cases you might want to use Optimum Blue (very light cut) foam pad.

Depending on level of defect in paint, you may need to add Compound step prior to polishing (Hyper Compound with Hyper Wool pad on DA for maximum correction).  If deeper scratches are limited to select areas, I would probably hand wet sand (using ONR solution as lubricant) those areas instead of Compound step. I typically use 3000 grit 3M Trizac  which incorporates foam backing to make it safer to use (minimize high pressure points).  Wet sanding with 3000 grit can actually be more effective at removing scratches while removing less clear coat than compound step.  I've done this several times on my BMW which has relatively "hard" paint.

For recent model GM paint (specifically GM trucks I believe), Optimum created the White foam pad which is supposed to be light cut yet stiff foam composition.  Certain GM vehicles are prone to light micro marring when using a long throw (21 mm) DA with lighter more flexible foam.  This is due to side to side action of DA combined with foam not holding shape during this action. My understanding is if you use smaller throw (8 mm - 15 mm) DA machine, you are less likely to encounter this problem using the standard Optimum foam pads.

The key to paint correction is having several tools available (different pads and compounds) and doing a test spot to determine what process works best to achieve your desired results.  Because every car and car owner expectation is different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just start with the least aggressive products first, review and then see if you need something stronger.  If the least aggressive combination does the trick then simply wax/sealant/coating and admire your work.  The paint may be very hard but it is better to find this out by working up in steps, using aggressive products on soft paint could easily bring a gown man to his knees in frustration!

I have read many times that Alfa Romeo have very soft paint, I often thought about this when using a wool pad on the rotary as the paint was like granite.  On some Alfa's the paint was ultra soft but others had medium hardness.   Don't assume the paint is soft/medium/hard, do a test section and see what works for your vehicle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The potential difference in clear coat is why I didn't respond to the original question about Mercedes or GM paints.  Even within a brand (Lexus comes to mind) there are variances by model and even color, so there's really no universal rule as to clear coat hardness.  As Lowe suggests,  you need to test a section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the delay.  Thank you for all of your responses.  I ordered a few different pads, the hyper twins and a few other things.  I figure I can start playing with some different combinations on the hood to see what works.  There aren't any deep scratches, but the clear is so hard that I have struggled to find something tough enough to cut it.  I think my last option will be to wet sand if I need to, but at that point it might be best to leave that to a professional.  Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now